4 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Surgery Risk Calculator Predicts Complications
    Physicians at Northwestern University’s Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center have developed a sophisticated online tool capable of accurately predicting a patient’s risk levels for death or complications and even the patient’s probable length of stay following nearly any surgical procedure.  Find out what impact this 23-question assessment, which can be filled out by the doctor and/or patient, could have on the number of surgeries being performed as well as reimbursements.
  2. Know the Human Being Behind the Diagnosis
    That “renal failure in 222” may actually be a husband, dad, award-winning journalist and an accomplished artist. Read why this physician says it’s important that you find out.
  3. Physicians’ Diagnostic Overconfidence May Be Harming Patients
    Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine detailed in a paper published in the JAMA Internal Medicine the discoveries they made in trying to determine what happens to a doctor’s confidence level when transitioning from easy cases to more complex situations.  Are doctors more likely to consult with a colleague or do more research depending on the severity of a perceived diagnosis?
  4. Campaign Affords Hispanics Ownership of Healthcare Decisions
    The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality is working to increase participation in a campaign that provides Spanish-speaking patients free resources designed to help them compare the risks and benefits of treatment options.

Campaign Affords Hispanics Ownership of Healthcare Decisions

ahrq_logoThe Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality is working to increase participation in a campaign that provides Spanish-speaking patients free resources designed to help them compare the risks and benefits of treatment options.  The Toma las riendas  (Take the reins) campaign prepares these patients for the conversations they need to have with their providers in order to make informed decisions regarding treatment.

The agency has established three ways for individuals to begin taking advantage of this program’s offerings:

  1. Patients and caregivers can sign up to receive brief text messages and tips via their mobile phones. To join the text messaging program, text COMPARE to 22764 to receive messages in English, or text MISALUD to 22764 for Spanish messages.
  2. Hispanics can learn more about various medical conditions and engage in conversations with their providers when they visit the program’s Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/AHRQehc.espanol.
  3. Spanish-speaking patients can call 1-800-358-9295 to obtain print versions of clinician and consumer research summaries offered by AHRQ’s Effective Health Care program. Please use reference code C-01.

For more information and to read AHRQ’s press release regarding the Toma las riendas campaign, click here.

4 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. It’s Judgment Day for Hospital Websites
    Exactly how transparent is your facility’s website? This week, The Leapfrog Group and UARC issued a call for entries for their Hospital Website Transparency Awards designed to encourage hospitals to publicly share, via the internet, quality measure information as well as present a more true-to-life depiction of their service offerings.
  2. In Florida, Cutting Readmissions by 15% Saved Hospitals $25M
    Access Florida Hospital Association’s report, Five Years of Quality: Working Together to Improve Care, and find out what steps their hospitals have taken toward establishing a national model for addressing readmissions, surgical complications and life-threatening infections all while avoiding millions of dollars in healthcare costs.
  3. More Hospitals Use Social Media to Gather Feedback from Patients’ Families 
    Now that patient satisfaction scores have begun to impact hospital payments, providers have started getting more creative when it comes to finding out what they need to do to improve patient and family experience.  Learn how e-advisers, electronic surveys and social media networks are changing the way patient voices are being heard while honoring their need for convenience and privacy.
  4. New Resource Presents 5-Step Process for Engaging Patients
    Download the American Hospital Association’s just-released guide, A Leadership Resource for Patient and Family Engagement Strategies, designed to help hospitals improve engagement with patients and their families.

New Resource Presents 5-Step Process for Engaging Patients

aha-logoThe American Hospital Association released a new guide, via its Pursuit of Excellence initiative, designed to help hospitals improve engagement with patients and their families.  The guide, A Leadership Resource for Patient and Family Engagement Strategies, focuses on evidence-based tactics that take into consideration the beliefs, values and preferences that can determine the varying levels of communication, care and support that different patients and families need while in the hospital.

The guide walks hospital leaders, clinicians and staff through the following five steps identified as key to the engagement process:

    1. Developing  a clear vision
    2. Determining improvement opportunities
    3. Prioritizing and planning
    4. Monitoring progress
    5. Providing ongoing implementation support

To access AHA’s newest patient engagement resource, click here.

3 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Federal Study Shows IT Improves Outcomes
    Access AHRQ’s new report, Findings and Lessons From the Improving Quality Through Clinician Use of Health IT Grant Initiative, which highlights IT tools now proven to enhance decision support, clinical workflow and care coordination.
  2. Talking Scales and Telemedicine: ACO Tools to Keep Patients Out of the Hospital
    Discover how certain telehealth tools are helping patients nationwide become more actively  involved in their own healthcare and, in turn, avoid hospital visits as a result of heightened engagement and consistency.
  3. Operating-Room Fire at Hospital Burns Patient, Prompts Changes
    Learn what new policies FirstHealth of North Carolina has instituted across its system to safeguard against incidents like the fire that resulted when vapor from sterilizing fluid ignited during an emergency life-saving procedure performed in one of its facilities in June.

 

5 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Berwick Names 11 Monsters Facing Hospital Industry
    Dr. Don Berwick, former acting head of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, implored attendees at the American Hospital Association’s recent Leadership Summit to face problems looming over the healthcare industry head-on and without fear.  Acknowledging that the industry has clearly come a long way, Berwick warned of the teeth-gnashing monsters fueled by greed, ignorance, excess, overutilization and waste that we have to come together to slay.
  2. Slow Ideas: Some innovations spread fast. How do you speed the ones that don’t?
    “Every change requires effort, and the decision to make that effort is a social process.”  Using the examples of anesthesia and antisepsis, Dr. Atul Gawande offers fascinating incite as to why some healthcare innovations spread like wildfire while others creep into acceptance over years and even decades.  Learn why he believes communication of new ideas must always incorporate a human component or “touch” in order to realize success.
  3. IHI Updates 4 How-to Guides for Improving Transitions of Care
    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released data last week suggesting that approximately one-third of hospitals in the United States will soon be financially penalized for having failed to lower unacceptable readmission rates. To encourage innovation in addressing this challenge, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has published updated versions of four How-to Guides aimed at improving transitions in care.
  4. 4 Reasons to Ban Social Media in Your Hospital
    Don’t let the headline fool you.  Your hospital’s ban on social media outlets like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn just might be relaying the wrong message to your organization’s employees, patients and the greater community.
  5. 3 New Places You’ll Find Healthcare
    As consumers become more in tune than ever with the concept of wellness, the availability of reliable healthcare advice between visits to the doctor is in high demand.  What venues might be in line and best-suited to deliver what today’s health-conscious patients want?

 

 

 

 

IHI Updates 4 How-to Guides for Improving Transitions of Care

STAARThe Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released data last week suggesting that approximately one-third of hospitals in the United States will soon be financially penalized for having failed to lower unacceptable readmission rates. To encourage innovation in addressing this challenge, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has published updated versions of four How-to Guides aimed at improving transitions in care.

The How-to Guides were developed through the STAAR (STate Action on Avoidable Rehospitalizations) initiative, a collaboration of IHI and The Commonwealth Fund. The free guides, which focus on transitions from the hospital to community settings, office practices, skilled nursing facilities and home health care, include new case studies, tools and explanations of developments like newly created billing codes for transitional care management.