4 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Tavenner: No ICD-10 Delay, But Expect Some MU Releif
    Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator, Marilyn Tavenner told attendees at this week’s HIMSS 2014 conference that, while the October 1, 2014 deadline for ICD-10 is non negotiable, organizations having difficulty meeting Meaningful Use requirements will be allowed some flexibility. Having said that, she urged groups to continue pressing forward in their march toward compliance.
  2. Patient Safety: Moving from Defect Reduction to Proactive Prevention
    Carol Haraden, PhD,  is vice president with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the executive lead for IHI’s Patient Safety Executive Development Program. Learn from this interview with Dr. Haraden regarding the changes she’s witnessed in patient safety over the last decade and watch a brief video in which she sums up her viewpoint of what’s really best for patients.
  3. AHA: CMS’ Policy for Observation Status Policy is “Unsustainable”
    Read the brief filed this week by the American Hospital Association claiming that CMS’ definition of observation status is “unsustainable” and places hospitals in an “untenable position.”
  4. New Scale Helps ED Docs Measure Risk for Adverse Events Associated with COPD
    A team of Canadian researchers has developed a new algorithm being used in emergency departments to successfully estimate patient risk for serious adverse events associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Explore findings from the team’s COPD study, led by Ian Stiell, MD, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Ottawa in Ontario.

New Scale Helps ED Docs Measure Risk for Adverse Events Associated with COPD

srwoman.lungs.300A team of Canadian researchers has developed a new algorithm being used in emergency departments to successfully estimate patient risk for serious adverse events associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to an article published by Medscape Medical News. Findings from the team’s COPD study, led by Ian Stiell, MD, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, were published online in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Typically a consequence of smoking, COPD is a leading cause of hospital admission among seniors, and research shows that at least one-third of patients hospitalized with COPD end up returning to an emergency department within 30 days of discharge. Researchers believe that the newly developed, Ottawa COPD Risk Scale, will help doctors determine which COPD patients need to be admitted to the hospital as opposed to those who can be safely released. In addition, they expect the innovative tool to aid in preventing serious adverse events including: death within 30 days of visiting an emergency department, intubation or ventilation, and myocardial infarction.

In the study, researchers examined 945 patients and ultimately identified 20 clinical and laboratory predictors of risk before establishing the 10-point scale, which incorporates a mix of data from a patient’s history, examinations and test results. Included in the scale were the following five variables, found to be independently associated with adverse events: prior intubation, initial heart rate ≥ 110/minute, being too ill to do a walk test, hemoglobin < 100 g/L and urea ≥ 12 mmol/L. In addition to the scale’s demonstrated reliability, doctors also have been encouraged by the ease and minimal cost associated with collecting needed data and identifying risk factors. 

To learn more and read the full text of the study, click here

3 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. CMS To Do ICD-10 Testing After All
    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services revealed in a Medicare Learning Network news flash that now the agency does plan to conduct end-to-end testing for ICD-10. Learn more about the CMS plan for testing within a small sampling of organizations representing a cross-section of provider types.  
  2. HAIs ‘Not Just a Nursing Problem’
    Nurses alone are not to be blamed when healthcare-associated infections occur, but they are the obvious choices when it comes to empowering leaders to propel the prevention movement within an organization according to a new study published in the American Journal of Infection Control
  3. Register Today for Free Diagnostic Error Webcasts
    The National Patient Safety Foundation is partnering with the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine and the Cautious Patient Foundation to produce a Diagnostic Error Webcast Series that will launch next month during Patient Safety Awareness Week 2014. Use the links provided to read details on each presentation and to register for participation. 

Register Today for Free Diagnostic Error Webcasts

PSAW2014.300The National Patient Safety Foundation is partnering with the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine and the Cautious Patient Foundation to produce a Diagnostic Error Webcast Series that will launch next month during Patient Safety Awareness Week 2014. Together, these organizations have assembled outstanding faculties composed of researchers, award-winning authors and patient safety advocates who will be sharing their knowledge through the webcasts. While participation in these presentations is free of charge, registration is required. To learn more about each offering, simply click on the links below:

March 3, 2014 – 1 p.m. ET
Patient and Family Engagement to Prevent Diagnostic Error
To learn more and register online, click here.  

March 12, 2014 – 2 p.m. ET
Diagnostic Safety in an EHR-Enabled Health Care System 
To learn more and register online, click here.

March 26, 2014 – 2 p.m. ET
How To Do A Root Cause Analysis of Diagnostic Error
To learn more and register online, click here.

 

 

 

3 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

mednews-roundup-logo-300x122We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. A Hidden Cause of Readmissions Comes to Light
    Hospitals are going to have to get serious about preventing surgical complications like venous thromboembolism (VTE) and infections, which many patients are developing following discharge, forcing them to return to the hospital. Learn why improved assessments of readiness for discharge are going to be essential if hospitals are going to avoid costly Medicare reimbursement reductions in the future.
  2. AMA Seeks to Stop ICD-10, Cites Soaring Costs
    Access an updated study released this week by the American Medical Association projecting that implementation of the federally mandated ICD-10 coding system will cost physicians three times as much as originally predicted. 
  3. HENs Reduce Harm, Save Big Money Over 2 Years
    The American Hospital Association’s Hospital Engagement Network has prevented 69,000 hospital-caused complications and saved over $201 million in healthcare costs. Read more about the success of the country’s largest HEN coalition as well as suggestions for maximizing the work of such networks.  

 

HENs Reduce Harm, Save Big Money Over 2 Years

PartnershipPatients.300 According to an article published by HealthLeaders Media, the American Hospital Association’s Hospital Engagement Network has prevented 69,000 hospital-caused complications and saved over $201 million in healthcare costs. The AHA’s network is the largest of 26 such coalitions participating in the $218 million HEN initiative funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and administered through the Partnership for Patients which has identified the following ten core patient safety issues as initial areas of focus for HEN: 

  1. Adverse Drug Events
  2. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections
  3. Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections
  4. Injuries from Falls and Immobility
  5. Obstetrical Adverse Events
  6. Pressure Ulcers
  7. Surgical Site Infections
  8. Venous Thromboembolism
  9. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia
  10. Readmissions

Patrick Conway, MD, chief medical officer for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, described the HEN initiative as a “major driver” of recent work done to drastically reduce medical harm nationwide over the last two years.  Conway said that HEN participants have “decreased central line infections by more than 45%, decreased surgical site infections by more than 22%, and… early elective deliveries… by approximately 50%.” 

Conway also explained that while 80 percent of the nation’s hospitals already are participating in HEN, 1,300 hospitals have yet to get on board which leaves a lot of opportunity for further improvement. Conway indicated several additional ways that quality leaders can maximize the impact that HEN can make on patient safety:

  • Report data for all 10 types of preventable harm.
  • Engage the C-Suite so you can broaden the scope of the program and focus on more types of harm.
  • Work beyond reducing harm and toward the sharing of best practices and elimination of disparities.
  • Engage patients and families because they often are able to bring hidden issues to the attention of clinicians.

To read the article, “Hospital Engagement Networks Lauded for Lessening Hospital Harm, Cost,” click here

 

5 Stories You Need But May Have Missed This Week

We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)mednews-roundup-logo-300x122

  1. CMS Clarifies Two-Midnight Rule After Enforcement Delay Announcement
    For the third time, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has delayed implementation of its controversial “Two-Midnight” rule which has been vehemently opposed by organizations including the American Hospital Association since its establishment last year. Read commentary made by CMS to help hospitals better understand current and future stipulations for conducting Inpatient Hospital Reviews. 
  2. 3 Inexpensive Ways to Enhance Patient Experience
    If not fancy food or big private rooms, what do patients want? You may be surprised at the sort of amenities research shows will help patients feel more positive about their stay in your facility.  
  3. Steering Clear of Diagnostic Errors Is Focus of 2014 Patient Safety Awareness Week 
    Healthcare organizations worldwide will join together in a concentrated effort aimed at energizing staff and educating patients how to “Navigate Your Health…Safely” during Patient Safety Awareness Week, March 2 – 8, 2014. Find out how you can get involved. 
  4. 10 Biggest Technological Advancements for Healthcare in the Last Decade 
    Healthcare looks a lot different than it did a decade ago because of technological advancements that have transformed nearly every process in the industry and even made it possible for patients to receive care and treatment outside clinical settings. Take a look at what 10 tech tools have had the greatest impact.
  5. Veterans Hospital Finds Ways to Tame MRSA Super Bug 
    What is the most effective method of preventing troublesome infections like MRSA? Learn why some physicians and consumer protection organizations recommend that we adopt Louisville Veterans Affairs Medical Center’s practice of screening every patient admitted for the deadly bug.