4 Stories You May Have Missed: Nurse Leaders – Case Study on Use of PS Culture Survey – White House Strategy to Combat Antibiotic Resistance – Adaptability on the Frontline

mednews-logo.300We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Looking to Transform Healthcare? – Ask a Nurse
    Teams in Texas, North Carolina, Indiana and Massachusetts have completed the Clinical Scene Investigator Academy program, developed by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses to empower bedside nurses as clinician leaders and change agents. Access excellent free and proven materials used in implementing successful initiatives to reduce pressure ulcers, prevent falls and help patients get back on their feet sooner. 
  2. Mercy Health Uses AHRQ’s Patient Safety Culture Survey and TeamSTEPPS to Enhance Care
    A new case study presented by Mercy Health describes how the system utilized the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and TeamSTEPPS to revamp its patient safety event reporting system, develop event management guidelines, and decrease reportable events.
  3. White House Actions on Antibiotic Resistance: Big Steps, Plus Disappointments
    Read the long-awaited Report to the President on Combating Antibiotic Resistance as well as a just-released national strategy for battling antibiotic- resistant bacteria and get a snippet of what certain experts are saying about initiatives proposed by the White House.
  4. Peter Drucker’s Brilliant 47-Year-Old Idea Could Transform Healthcare
    Frontline healthcare professionals have long understood the skill of thinking on your feet. Now, it’s time for healthcare leadership to embrace, empower and trust team members with the ability to adapt.

[WEBINAR] Register Today for NPSF’s CPPS Review Course

education concept. 300The National Patient Safety Foundation will host a webinar on Thursday, October 23, 2014, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (ET), aimed at helping experienced patient safety professionals prepare for the Certified Professional in Patient Safety (CPPS) examination.

Since the establishment of the CPPS credential in 2012, more than 600 healthcare professionals have attained certification, distinguishing themselves as having met the competency requirements in the areas of patient safety science and human factors engineering and having demonstrated the ability to plan and implement successful patient safety initiatives.

NPSF’s CPPS Review Course will include opportunities to:

  • Review in depth the six patient safety domains, following the exam content outline;
  • Discuss patient safety scenario examples similar to actual exam questions; and
  • Assess their own level of preparedness for the exam and address additional areas for self-study.

The cost for the course is $355 US  for members of the American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety, and $395 US  for non-members. To save on enrollment in the course, non-members can click here to join.

To learn more about the review course and to register online, click here.

4 Stories You May Have Missed: Teach Back Approach – Paradigm Shift in Opioid Safety – Changes to 2015 TJC Manual – Fear, Distrust Fuel Repeat ED Visits

mednews-logo.300We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed and need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. Teach Back: Reduce the Cost of Poor Patient Education
    Read this blogger’s personal account of how a different approach to discharge instructions helped to empower a family to successfully provide the at-home care their family member needed.
  2. PPAHS Joins Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation in Call for a “Paradigm Shift” in Opioid Safety
    Download a powerful video that shows how continuous electronic monitoring of oxygenation and ventilation can greatly decrease the likelihood of unrecognized, life- threatening, opioid-induced respiratory impairment.
  3.  Joint Commission to Add New Patient Safety Chapter to Manual
    Learn more about the new chapter on Patient Safety Systems and The Joint Commission’s revised definition of “sentinel events” both which will be included in the agency’s Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals beginning January 1. 2015. 
  4. STUDY: Fear and Distrust of System Prompt Repeat ED Visits
    Patients who return to the Emergency Department within just a few days of an ED discharge do so primarily because they don’t believe they are going to get timely and quality follow-up care and because they’re worried about the potential for disease progression, according to a study published online in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

STUDY: Fear and Distrust of System Prompt Repeat ED Visits

emergencysign.300Patients who return to the Emergency Department within just a few days of an ED discharge do so primarily because they don’t believe they are going to get timely and quality follow-up care and because they’re worried about the potential for disease progression, according to a study published online in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

While financial disincentives for readmissions have prompted recent interest in “unnecessary” hospital visits, little research has been done to learn exactly what motivates patients to make the decision to return to the hospital within a short time-frame.  In the study, Return Visits to the Emergency Department : The Patient Perspective, researchers looked at 60 patients who returned to the ED within 9 days of discharge. They examined the personal experiences and challenges the patients faced in transitioning home after their discharge from the ED.

Researchers cited fear associated with their condition, lack of insurance and even dissatisfaction and lack of trust in their primary care physician as key reasons for returning to the ED. Patients also described frustrations with their clinics that included inconveniences and lack resources needed to successfully treat certain conditions.

To read the study, Return Visits to the Emergency Department : The Patient Perspective, click here.

2 Stories You May Have Missed: CMS Resumes Reporting of Serious Med Errors – CDC Monitors Spread of Illness Caused by Enterovirus D68

mednews-logo.300We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Below is a roundup of stories you may have missed and need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1.  Feds Reverse Course, Will Release Hospital Mistake Data
    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has reversed its decision to halt publication of certain serious medical mistakes made in hospitals. CMS officials said that the data on eight hospital-acquired conditions, which it quietly made unavailable to the public last month, now will be made available to researchers, consumers and patient safety advocates via the CMS website, but not on the agency’s Hospital Compare site.
  2. CDC Monitors Spread of Respiratory Illness Caused by Enterovirus D68
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that hospitals in Missouri and Illinois are seeing more children than usual with severe respiratory illness caused by enterovirus D68, and hospitals in other states are paying close attention to clusters of children presenting with similar symptoms possibly caused by the same virus.

 

CMS Resumes Reporting Data on Serious Med Errors

cmstag.300According to an article in USA TODAY, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has reversed its decision to halt publication of certain serious medical mistakes made in hospitals. CMS officials said that the data on eight hospital-acquired conditions, which it quietly made unavailable to the public last month, now will be made available to researchers, consumers and patient safety advocates via the CMS website, but not on the agency’s Hospital Compare site.

The eight HACs that CMS will resume reporting include:

  • Blood incompatibility,
  • Catheter-associated infections,
  • Falls and trauma,
  • Foreign objects left in body after surgery,
  • Pressure ulcers,
  • Uncontrolled blood sugar levels, and
  • Urinary tract infections.

Although this information will not figure into CMS’s Hospital Compare reports, other organizations. like Leapfrog, will be able to use the data in computing its safety ratings.

To read USA TODAY’s article, regarding the reporting of medical error data, click here.

CDC Monitors Spread of Respiratory Illness Caused by Enterovirus D68

CDC.300The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that hospitals in Missouri and Illinois are seeing more children than usual with severe respiratory illness caused by enterovirus D68, and hospitals in other states are paying close attention to clusters of children presenting with similar symptoms possibly caused by the same virus. More than half of the 30 children with confirmed cases, diagnosed at children’s hospitals in Kansas City, MO and Chicago, have histories of asthma or wheezing.

Officials with the CDC say the agency is monitoring the situation very closely, and they recommend that healthcare providers consider the virus as a possible cause for any severe respiratory illnesses they are seeing in young children right now. The CDC is working to assist states in testing for the virus and asking providers to report unusual upswings in severe respiratory cases to state and local health authorities.

EV-D68 was first isolated in California in 1962 but has been rarely reported in the U.S.  As with other enteroviruses, this strain, is common in summer and fall and tends to spread through close contact with infected people. While there are no vaccines or treatments for the virus, the CDC is offering the following prevention tips for managing the spread of the illness:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water, especially after using the toilet and changing diapers,
  • Avoid close contact, such as touching and shaking hands, with people who are sick, and
  • Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

To read the release, regarding the spread of severe respiratory illness associated with Enterovirus D68, issued via the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, click here.