7 Stories You Need: Decision Tech in ER, Why Disclosure Policies Exist, 2017 IPPS Proposed Rule

mednews-logo.300We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Here’s a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions In the ER
    Discover the types of shared decision-making aids some hospitals are using to assist patients in choosing a course for emergency treatment for conditions involving heart issues to appendicitis.  The Wall Street Journal
  2. Hospital Leaves Tube in Aorta, Doesn’t Tell Patient, Fights Lawsuit — great test case for risk, claims, and legal team. How would they handle differently?
    Disclosure policies can serve a bigger purpose than meeting regulatory requirements when the policies are actually followed. Consider this real-life situation where an injured patient gave a Dallas hospital two chances to make things right before eventually taking legal action against the institution she had trusted throughout her life. Sorry Works! Blog
  3. CMS delays overall hospital star ratings release: 4 things to know
    According to CMS, new overall star ratings, which are to include quality measures such as readmissions, mortality, effectiveness of care and timeliness of care as well as patient experience scores, are now set for publication in July. Becker’s Infection Control & Clinical Quality
  4. Toward a Safer Health Care System – The Critical Need to Improve Measurement
    Two leading patient safety experts, Ashish Jha, M.D.,  and Peter Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., have published an appeal that calls for more collaboration on the part of the CMS, CDC and Congress in developing patient safety measures that truly matter and do not punish facilities that are most vigilant about identifying adverse events.  JAMA
  5. CMS’ 2017 IPPS proposed rule: 10 points to know
    Find out what you need to know about the 2017 Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System proposed rule which does away with the two-midnight rule’s inpatient pay cuts. Becker’s Hospital CFO
  6. Caring Safely Patient Story: ‘I Was All That Mattered To Her’
    Former patient, Katie Dick is now an influential member of a Patient Partner Program within Canada’s University Health Network. Read how one nurse’s intense focus on Katie, following a scary medical mistake, allowed physicians to promptly address the error and inspired Katie’s commitment to patient safety advocacy. University Health Network
  7. How Big of a Public Health Issue Is Patient Safety?
    While the movement to improve patient safety has seen significant advances, these authors believe much more needs to be done in order to meet the goal of protecting all patients in all health care settings. Future of Health

 

Partnership Develops Free Toolkit for Safe Use of Copy & Paste

Tcopypastekey300he Partnership for Health IT Patient Safety recently released a free resource designed to improve health IT safety. The Health IT Safe Practices: Toolkit for the Safe Use of Copy and Paste presents four Safe Practice Recommendations for copy and paste along with practical assessment tools, training materials, and sample policies and procedures that you can use in implementing the Partnership’s suggested practices.

National Patient Safety Foundation President and CEO Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, chaired the 40-member work group that developed the copy and paste guidelines, and more than 25 organizations have formally supported the group’s recommendations.

To download the Health IT Safe Practices: Toolkit for the Safe Use of Copy and Paste, click here.

9 Stories You Need: TedTalks Address Preventable Harm, Predicting Readmissions, Benefits of Take-Home IV Antibiotics

mednews-logo.300We know you’re busy, but we don’t want you to miss important healthcare quality and patient safety news. Here is a roundup of stories you may have missed but need to take a look at before calling it a week. (Sign up on the right if you’d like these news alerts delivered to you.)

  1. CDC’s 3-step hand-washing technique vs. WHO’s 6-step technique: Which is most effective?
    Consider results from a new study, published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, which shows six steps may indeed be better than 3 where hand washing is concerned. Becker’s Infection Control & Clinical Quality
  2. It’s Not All About the Checklist: The Power of Believing and Belonging   
    Take some time to watch a set of TED Talks that illustrate the intangible ingredient of “believing and belonging” that Dr. Peter Pronovost deems essential to ending preventable harm.  The Armstrong Institute
  3. Hospital Software Often Doesn’t Flag Unsafe Drug Prescriptions, Report Finds 
    While many hospitals are turning to computerized medication systems, a new study, performed by the Leapfrog Group, shows that such systems still fall short in catching common medication errors. Consider the findings that indicate a need for vigilance and thorough checks and balances for medication distribution in hospitals. Kaiser Health News
  4. ONC launches website focused on using IT to curb opioid abuse  
    Link to the Department of Health and Human Services’ new website aimed at attacking our country’s opioid crisis head on. Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review
  5. Readmission Prediction Score Validated in Multi-country Study 
    Learn more about how using e-helath records to calculate patient HOSPITAL scores can help clinicians identify patients who are at highest risk for a 30-day readmission and subsequently assign appropriate interventions.  HealthLeaders Media
  6. Patient-centered perioperative checklists to improve surgical care quality 
    Read how using a surgical safety checklist can be beneficial in communicating a clear perioperative plan before, during and after surgery.   KevinMD
  7. ONC Seeks Input Developing Interoperability Metrics
    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has issued a request for input that can be used in designing metrics for measuring progress toward a future of free-flowing health data between providers and patients with the aim of generating improved care, curbed spending and a healthier population.
  8. Readmissions Dip 47% When Some Patients Self-administer IV Antibiotics   
    Read about the success of a program initiated at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas in which uninsured patients are being trained to administer their own IV antibiotics at home when infections require prolonged treatment. HealthLeaders Media
  9. Let Patients Read Their Medical Records 
    Consider one resident physician’s opinion that in this digital age what needs to be mandatory is the art of story gathering and storytelling. Find out why his experiences with files discovered to be “littered with inaccuracies” have him convinced that patients need to be encouraged to review their own medical records.  New York Times

 

ONC Seeks Input Developing Interoperability Metrics

Interop300The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has issued a request for input that can be used in designing metrics for measuring progress toward a future of free-flowing health data between providers and patients with the aim of generating improved care, curbed spending and a healthier population.

According to the ONC’s Request for Information, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) “declares it a national objective to achieve widespread exchange of health information through interoperable certified electronic health record (EHR) technology nationwide by December 31, 2018.” In addition, as explained in a post on the ONC’s Health IT Buzz Blog, the act also charges the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with the responsibility of consulting with the health IT community to establish metrics that can be used in determining whether or not this objective has been met.

The ONC is requesting input based on the following three questions:

  1. What populations and elements of information flow should we measure?
  2. How can we use current data sources and associated metrics to address the MACRA requirements?
  3. What other data sources and metrics should HHS consider to measure interoperability more broadly?

In addition to helping with the development of interoperability metrics, input from the health IT community will help HHS gauge its pace in achieving overall objectives laid out in its Interoperability Roadmap and the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan.

The public comment period will close on June 3, 2016. To view and download the ONC’s Request for Information, including directions for submitting input, click here.